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2017 FBAR Deadline | FinCEN Form 114 FBAR Lawyer & Attorney

FinCEN recently confirmed the 2017 FBAR deadline and the automatic extension option.

2017 FBAR Deadline: FBAR Background

FinCEN Form 114, the Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts, is commonly known as FBAR.  US taxpayers should use this form to report their financial interest in or signatory authority over foreign financial accounts. Failure to timely file the FBAR may result in the imposition of draconian FBAR penalties.

2017 FBAR Deadline: Traditional FBAR Deadline

Prior to 2016 FBAR, the taxpayers had to file their FBARs for each relevant calendar year by June 30 of the following year. No filings extensions were allowed. The last FBAR that followed this deadline was 2015 FBAR (its due date was June 30, 2016).

2017 FBAR Deadline: Changes to FBAR Deadline Starting 2016 FBAR

The Surface Transportation and Veterans Health Care Choice Improvement Act of 2015 (the “Act”) changed the FBAR deadline starting with 2016 FBAR.  Section 2006(b)(11) of the Act requires the FBARs to be filed by the due date of that year’s tax return (i.e. usually April 15), not June 30.

Furthermore, during the transition period, the IRS granted to US taxpayers an automatic extension of the FBAR filing deadline to October 15. The taxpayers do not need to make any specific requests in order for extension to be granted.

In other words, starting 2016 FBAR, the Act adjusted the FBAR due date to coincide with the federal income tax filing deadlines. Moreover, the new FBAR filing deadline will follow to the letter the federal income tax due date guidance. The federal income tax due date guidance states that, in situations where the tax return due date falls on a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday, the IRS must delay the due date until the next business day.

2017 FBAR Deadline

Based on the new law, the 2017 FBAR deadline will be April 17, 2018 (same as 2017 income tax return due date). If a taxpayer does not file his 2017 FBAR by April 17, 2018, then the IRS will automatically grant an extension until October 15, 2018. Failure to file 2017 FBAR by October 15, 2018, may result in the imposition of FBAR civil and criminal penalties.

Official Treasury Currency Conversion Rates of December 31, 2009

These Official Treasury 2009 FBAR Conversion Rates are posted here due to the fact that U.S. taxpayers who are doing voluntary disclosure for prior years with respect to delinquent FBARs are required to use these rates to prepare the FBARs for 2009.  Every year, the U.S. Department of Treasure publishes its official currency conversion rates (they are called “Treasury’s Financial Management Service rates”); I will refer to the “FBAR Conversion Rates”.

The latest (October 2013) FBAR instructions require the use of Treasury’s Financial Management Service rates, if available, to determine the maximum value of a foreign bank account. In particular, the FBAR instructions state:

In the case of non-United States currency, convert the maximum account value for each account into United States dollars. Convert foreign currency by using the Treasury’s Financial Management Service rate (this rate may be found at www.fms.treas.gov) from the last day of the calendar year. If no Treasury Financial Management Service rate is available, use another verifiable exchange rate and provide the source of that rate. In valuing currency of a country that uses multiple exchange rates, use the rate that would apply if the currency in the account were converted into United States dollars on the last day of the calendar year.

For this reason, the international tax attorneys take their time to compile these rates with all updates. For your convenience, Sherayzen Law Office provides a table of the official  2009 FBAR Conversion Rates below (keep in mind, you still need to refer to the official website for any updates).

COUNTRY-CURRENCY F.C. TO $1.00
AFGHANISTAN – AFGHANI 47.9200
ALBANIA – LEK 95.4300
ALGERIA – DINAR 70.3330
ANGOLA – KWANZA 75.0000
ANTIGUA – BARBUDA – E. CARIBBEAN DOLLAR 2.7000
ARGENTINA-PESO 3.7980
ARMENIA – DRAM 375.0000
AUSTRALIA – DOLLAR 1.1110
AUSTRIA – EURO 0.6950
AZERBAIJAN – MANAT 0.8200
BAHAMAS – DOLLAR 1.0000
BAHRAIN – DINAR 0.3770
BANGLADESH – TAKA 68.0000
BARBADOS – DOLLAR 2.0200
BELARUS – RUBLE 2880.0000
BELGIUM-EURO 0.6950
BELIZE – DOLLAR 2.0000
BENIN – CFA FRANC 454.8900
BERMUDA – DOLLAR 1.0000
BOLIVIA – BOLIVIANO 6.9700
BOSNIA-HERCEGOVINA MARKA 1.3590
BOTSWANA – PULA 6.6530
BRAZIL – REAL 1.7400
BRUNEI – DOLLAR 1.4010
BULGARIA – LEV 1.3580
BURKINA FASO – CFA FRANC 454.8900
BURMA – KYAT 450.0000
BURUNDI – FRANC 1200.0000
CAMBODIA (KHMER) – RIEL 4163.0000
CAMEROON – CFA FRANC 454.8900
CANADA – DOLLAR 1.0510
CAPE VERDE – ESCUDO 74.7270
CAYMAN ISLANDS – DOLLAR 0.8200
CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC – CFA FRANC 454.8900
CHAD – CFA FRANC 454.8900
CHILE – PESO 507.0000
CHINA – RENMINBI 6.8260
COLOMBIA – PESO 2046.5000
COMOROS – FRANC 361.3500
CONGO – CFA FRANC 454.8900
COSTA RICA – COLON 553.7000
COTE D’IVOIRE – CFA FRANC 454.8900
CROATIA – KUNA 5.0000
CUBA-PESO 0.9260
CYPRUS-EURO 0.6950
CZECH – KORUNA 18.1190
DEM REP OF CONGO-CONGOLESE FRANC 900.0000
DENMARK – KRONE 5.1670
DJIBOUTI – FRANC 177.0000
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC – PESO 36.1000
EAST TIMOR-DILI 1.0000
ECAUDOR-DOLARES 1.0000
EGYPT – POUND 5.4840
EL SALVADOR-DOLARES 1.0000
EQUATORIAL GUINEA – CFA FRANC 454.8900
ERITREA – NAKFA 15.0000
ESTONIA – KROON 10.8650
ETHIOPIA – BIRR 12.6400
EURO ZONE – EURO 0.6950
FIJI – DOLLAR 1.9250
FINLAND-EURO 0.6950
FRANCE-EURO 0.6950
GABON – CFA FRANC 454.8900
GAMBIA – DALASI 27.0000
GEORGIA-LARI 1.6900
GERMANY FRG-EURO 0.6950
GHANA – CEDI 1.4290
GREECE-EURO 0.6950
GRENADA – EAST CARIBBEAN DOLLAR 2.7000
GUATEMALA-QUENTZEL 8.3320
GUINEA -FRANC 4924.0000
GUINEA BISSAU – CFA FRANC 454.8900
GUYANA – DOLLAR 201.0000
HAITI – GOURDE 40.7500
HONDURAS – LEMPIRA 18.9000
HONG KONG – DOLLAR 7.7540
HUNGARY – FORINT 187.7700
ICELAND – KRONA 124.4500
INDIA – RUPEE 46.4000
INDONESIA – RUPIAH 9350.0000
IRAN – RIAL 8229.0000
IRAQ – DINAR 1150.0000
IRELAND-EURO 0.6950
ISRAEL-SHEKEL 3.7800
ITALY-EURO 0.6950
JAMAICA – DOLLAR 89.3000
JAPAN – YEN 92.3900
JERESALEM-SHEKEL 3.7800
JORDAN – DINAR 0.7080
KAZAKHSTAN – TENGE 148.4000
KENYA – SHILLING 75.8500
KOREA – WON 1163.6500
KUWAIT – DINAR 0.2860
KYRGYZSTAN – SOM 44.0000
LAOS – KIP 8476.0000
LATVIA – LATS 0.4920
LEBANON – POUND 1500.0000
LESOTHO – SOUTH AFRICAN RAND 7.3690
LIBERIA – U.S. DOLLAR 49.0000
LIBYA-DINAR 1.2340
LITHUANIA – LITAS 2.3980
LUXEMBOURG-EURO 0.6950
MACAO – MOP 8.0000
MACEDONIA FYROM – DENAR 42.3000
MADAGASCAR-ARIA 1954.6400
MALAWI – KWACHA 146.0000
MALAYSIA – RINGGIT 3.4220
MALI – CFA FRANC 454.8900
MALTA-EURO 0.6950
MARSHALLS ISLANDS – DOLLAR 1.0000
MARTINIQUE-EURO 0.6950
MAURITANIA – OUGUIYA 270.0000
MAURITIUS – RUPEE 29.0000
MEXICO – NEW PESO 13.0990
MICRONESIA – DOLLAR 1.0000
MOLDOVA – LEU 12.1850
MONGOLIA – TUGRIK 1435.8800
MONTENEGRO-EURO 0.6950
MOROCCO – DIRHAM 7.9030
MOZAMBIQUE – METICAL 29.2800
NAMIBIA-DOLLAR 7.3690
NEPAL – RUPEE 74.4000
NETHERLANDS-EURO 0.6950
NETHERLANDS ANTILLES – GUILDER 1.7800
NEW ZEALAND – DOLLAR 1.3740
NICARAGUA – CORDOBA 20.8400
NIGER – CFA FRANC 454.8900
NIGERIA – NAIRA 149.4500
NORWAY – KRONE 5.7640
OMAN – RIAL 0.3850
PAKISTAN – RUPEE 84.2000
PALAU-DOLLAR 1.0000
PANAMA – BALBOA 1.0000
PAPUA NEW GUINEA – KINA 2.5230
PARAGUAY – GUARANI 4650.0000
PERU – INTI 0.0000
PERU – NUEVO SOL 2.8900
PHILIPPINES – PESO 46.4500
POLAND – ZLOTY 2.8500
PORTUGAL-EURO 0.6950
QATAR – RIYAL 3.6420
ROMANIA – LEU 2.9420
RUSSIA-RUBLE 30.3110
RWANDA – FRANC 569.4700
SAO TOME & PRINCIPE – DOBRAS 16539.2150
SAUDI ARABIA – RIYAL 3.7500
SENEGAL – CFA FRANC 454.8900
SERBIA-DINAR 66.7300
SEYCHELLES – RUPEE 10.9180
SIERRA LEONE – LEONE 3930.0000
SINGAPORE – DOLLAR 1.4010
SLOVAK-EURO 0.6950
SLOVENIA-EURO 0.6950
SOLOMON ISLANDS – DOLLAR 7.3580
SOUTH AFRICA – RAND 7.3690
SPAIN-EURO 0.6950
SRI LANKA – RUPEE 114.3500
ST LUCIA – EC DOLLAR 2.7000
SUDAN-POUND 2.3140
SURINAME – GUILDER 2.8000
SWAZILAND – LILANGENI 7.3690
SWEDEN – KRONA 7.1160
SWITZERLAND – FRANC 1.0310
SYRIA – POUND 45.5000
TAIWAN – DOLLAR 31.9500
TAJIKISTAN-SOMONI 4.3800
TANZANIA – SHILLING 1335.0000
THAILAND – BAHT 33.3000
TOGO – CFA FRANC 454.8900
TONGA – PA’ANGA 1.8760
TRINIDAD & TOBAGO – DOLLAR 6.3300
TUNISIA – DINAR 1.3180
TURKEY-LIRA 1.4930
TURKMENISTAN – MANAT 2.8430
UGANDA – SHILLING 1895.0000
UKRAINE – HRYVNIA 8.0300
UNITED ARAB EMIRATES – DIRHAM 3.6730
UNITED KINGDOM – POUND STERLING 0.6160
URUGUAY – NEW PESO 19.4500
UZBEKISTAN – SOM 1525.0000
VANUATU – VATU 96.0900
VENZEULA – NEW BOLIVAR 2.1500
VIETNAM – DONG 18469.0000
WESTERN SAMOA – TALA 2.5190
YEMEN – RIAL 206.0000
YUGOSLAVIA – DINAR 66.7300
ZAMBIA-KWACHA 4640.0000
ZIMBABWE – DOLLAR 0.0000

 

FBAR Deadline Extension for Signature Authority Only – IRS Notice 2011-54

On June 16, 2011, the Internal Revenue Service issued IRS Notice 2011-54, granting additional relief to persons with signature or other authority over, but no financial interest in, a foreign financial account held during calendar year 2009 or earlier calendar years.

Previous, IRS Notices 2009-62 and 2010-23 already extended this deadline until June 30, 2010: “Persons with signature authority over, but no financial interest in, a foreign financial account for which an FBAR would otherwise have been due on June 30, 2010, will now have until June 30, 2011, to report those foreign financial accounts.” (IRS Notice 2010-23).

Notice 2011-54 further states that:

Persons having signature authority over, but no financial interest in, a foreign financial account in 2009 or earlier calendar years for which the reporting deadline was extended by Notice 2009-62 or Notice 2010-23 will now have until November 1, 2011, to file FBARs with respect to those accounts. The deadline for reporting signature authority over, or a financial interest in, foreign financial accounts for the 2010 calendar year remains June 30, 2011.

Thus, IRS Notice 2011-54 extends the FBAR filing deadline from June 30, 2011 until November 1, 2011 for all persons with signature authority over, but no financial interest in, a foreign financial account in 2009 or earlier calendar years.

Be careful, though – the deadline for the 2010 FBAR remains June 30, 2011.

Also, note that the relief granted by FinCEN Notices 2011-1 and 2011-2 is not affected by IRS Notice 2011-54.

Contact Sherayzen Law Office NOW For FBAR Help

If you believe that you may be subject to FBAR requirements, contact Sherayzen Law Office as soon as possible. Our experienced international tax firm will guide you through the complex maze of FBAR reporting requirements, including any voluntary disclosure issues.

Remember, it does not matter whether you are located in another state or outside of the United States – we can help!

Definition of “U.S. person” for FBAR (Report on Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts) Purposes

Since October of 2008, the definition of a “U.S. person” has been going through a turbulent phase of uncertainty with periodic expansions and retractions. The pre-2008 FBAR instructions (dating back to July of 2000 version) defined the “U.S. person” broadly as: “(1) a citizen or resident of the United States, (2) a domestic partnership, (3) a domestic corporation, or (4) a domestic estate or trust.” See IRS Announcement 2010-16.

Two important features of this definition stand out. First, the term “person” is defined to include not only individuals, but also virtually any type of business entity, estate or trust. 31 C.F.R. §103.11(z) Even a single-member LLC, which is generally disregarded for tax purposes, may be classified as a U.S. person because it has a separate juridical existence from its owner. A partnership or a corporation created or organized in the United States is considered to “domestic” under 26 U.S.C. §7701(a)(4). Second, the definition of who should be considered as a U.S. resident is interpreted under 26 U.S.C. §7701. Under 26 U.S.C. §7701(b), an individual is a U.S. resident if he meets any of the three bright-line tests: (1) lawful admission for permanent residence to the United States (“green card”); (2) substantial presence in the U.S.: the sum of the number of days on which such individual was present in the United States during the current year and the 2 preceding calendar years (when multiplied by the applicable multiplier determined under the following table) equals or exceeds 183 days; (3) and first-year election to be treated as a resident under 26 U.S.C. §7701(b)(4). Thus, the definition of a U.S. resident under the tax rules is much broader than the one used in immigration law.

In October of 2008, the IRS revised the FBAR instructions and further expanded the definition of a “U.S. person” by including the persons “in and doing business in the United States.” This revision caused a widespread confusion among tax professionals. The outburst of comments and questions prompted the IRS to issue Announcements 2009-51 and 2010-16, suspending FBAR filing requirement through June of 2010 (i.e. for calendar years 2008 and 2009) for persons who are not U.S. citizens, U.S. residents, and domestic entities. Instead, the tax professionals were referred back to July of 2000 FBAR definition of a “U.S. person.”

In the meantime, in February of 2010, the IRS published new Proposed FBAR regulations under 31 C.F.R. §103. The proposed rules modify the definition of a “U.S. person” as follows: “a citizen or resident of the United States, or an entity, including but not limited to a corporation, partnership, trust or limited liability company, created, organized, or formed under the laws of the United States, any state, the District of Columbia, the Territories, and Insular Possessions of the United States or the Indian Tribes.” 75 Fed. Reg. 8845 (proposed February 23, 2010) (to be codified as 31 C.F.R. 103.24(b)). This definition applies even if an entity elected to be disregarded for tax purposes. Id. The determination of a U.S. resident status is to be done according to 26 U.S.C. §7701(b) and regulations there under, except the meaning of the “United States”(which is to be defined by 31 U.S.C. 103.11(nn)). Id.

Thus, if the proposed regulations will ultimately be codified in their current form, the definition of the “U.S. person” will be slightly broader than that of the July of 2000, but will represent a major regression from October 2008 definition. Nevertheless, based on even existing (July of 2000) definition of the “U.S. person,” the IRS has been able to cast a wide net over U.S. taxpayers, trying to force disclosure of as many foreign financial accounts as possible.